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HomeArchitectureThe Biscuit Loft // OWIU

The Biscuit Loft // OWIU


Text description provided by the architects.

Biscuit Loft is a Japanese-inspired apartment in LA’s burgeoning Arts District. Housed within the old Nabisco bakery building, the loft’s interior architecture has been transformed into a two-bedroom urban hideaway. OWIU avoided a cluttered scheme, as often happens in loft spaces, creating a homey environment for practical use. Maximizing every inch, OWIU created additional quarters with distinct uses – the result merges Asian design principles with Southern California industrial edge, creating an environment that inspires mindfulness.

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

The firm maintained the expansive feel while providing well-planned interventions that maximize usage, as the Japanese-inspired ethos creates clear functions for each area of the home. As one enters the loft, the immediate size of the space is apparent and framed by the hanging Noguchi Akari lights. The ground-floor frames the grandiose staircase, which is assembled from 10 custom fabricated panels and four angled interventions, breaking up the visual continuity and seamlessly blending into the mezzanine.

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

The upper mezzanine functions as a semi-private study area and entryway to the master bedroom. The mezzanine was extended by 130 sq. feet with wooden pilotis to provide extended ground-floor cover and section off the guest bedroom entryway. The intervention creates a private, tranquil space for the master bedroom.Designed during the pandemic, when the concept of “home” was reimagined, the loft borrows centuries-old strategies from Japanese homes, which take into consideration the user’s lifestyle.

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

The guest bedroom was inspired by the ryokan, a 17th century inn where one sleeps on a tatami mat that can be rolled up and stored. OWIU created a convertible platform that holds a stored futon when needed, but also serves as a tea room for the homeowner. The minimalist tea room is a quiet area that can be used for moments of stillness and disconnection, as well as intimate social gatherings.Design Team: Joel Wong, Amanda Gunawan, Claudia Wainer, Eduardo Cortazar.

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

© OWIU

The Biscuit Loft Gallery



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